Post link 06 June 2016, 23:05
    Cities from the deep: Wonders of ancient Egypt go on show for the first time after spending a thousands years submerged beneath the Mediterranean
  • Artefacts dredged up from ruins of lost cities in the Nile delta will go on display at the British Museum on Thursday
  • Highlights include a 5.4 metre statue of a Nile god, a huge hieroglyphic tablet and jewellery belonging to pharaohs
  • The recovered treasure comes from the lost cities of Heracleion and Canopus, which vanished around 800AD

Ancient Egyptian metropolis found below the Mediterranean
Reclaimed from the deeps: Diver Franck Goddio poses with an inscribed tablet he found in the ruins of Heracleion in Aboukir Bay, Egypt

PUBLISHED: 14:19, 17 May 2016 | By STEPHANIE LINNING FOR MAILONLINE

Archaeological wonders that lay beneath the Mediterranean seabed for more than a thousand years are to go on show for the first time.
Towering statues, golden jewellery and hieroglyphic tablets that were feared to have been lost forever have been reclaimed from the sea and will be go on display in a major exhibition at the British Museum.
The treasures belong to the sunken cities of Heracleion and Canopus, built on the shifting ground of the Nile delta, which are now buried beneath 10ft (3 metres) of silt.
Photographs released today offer a sneak peek inside the highly anticipated exhibition, which opens on Thursday.

Ancient Egyptian metropolis found below the Mediterranean
Towering: A visitor looks at the 'Colossal statues of a king and a queen' (283-246 BC), which are refelcted in a display cabinet glass

Ancient Egyptian metropolis found below the MediterraneanAncient Egyptian metropolis found below the Mediterranean

Long lost treasures: The Stele of Thonis-Heracleion, which was discovered on the site of Thonis-Heracleion. Right, the statue of Arsinoe

Ancient Egyptian metropolis found below the Mediterranean
Beautiful: The statue (left) is certainly one of the queens of the Ptolemaic dynasty (likely Arsinoe II) dressed as the goddess Isis
Striking: The Statue of Arsinoe, pictured in the new British Museum exhibition, must have been larger than life size fully intact

Ancient texts record the existence of the settlements, which were the gateway to Egypt before Alexandria rose to prominence. But the two trading hubs were lost - literally - to the sands of time until a chance discovery in 1996.
Divers in the mouth of the Nile unearthed the treasures, and have spent almost two decades since painstakingly dredging them out of the deep.

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Highlights of the collection include a 6ft (1.9 metre) heirogylphic tablet inscribed with a royal declaration from Pharaoh Nectanebo I and a 5.4m statue of Hapy, an Egyptian god who personifies the Nile's floods.
The exhibition, called Sunken Cities: Egypt's Lost World, will run from 9 May to November. It will combine items from the Museum's own archives with items on special loan from Egyptian authorities, who rarely let the artefacts leave their country.

Ancient Egyptian metropolis found below the Mediterranean
Fascinating: The 1.9m Stele of Thonis-Heracleion, inscribed with the decree of Saϊs and was discovered on the site of Thonis-Heracleion. It was commissioned by Nectanebos I (378-362 BC) and is almost identical to the Stele of Naukratis in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo


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Franck Goddio and divers from his team inspect the statue of a pharaoh

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Topic edited 2 times, last edit by RouTe, 23 July 2016, 2:02  

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