Post link 13 June 2015, 15:11
By Rachel Feltman June 8 2015 washingtonpost.com

Miss DARPA’s big robotics challenge? Here’s a compilation of all the robots that fell.

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Finalists in the DARPA Robotics Challenge undertook practice runs with their robots ahead of the finals at Fairplex in Pomona, Calif. The event requires robots to attempt a simulated disaster response course. (DARPA)

On June 5 and 6, DARPA held the final round of its thrilling robotics competition. The DARPA Robotics Challenge (DRC) required stunning feats of engineering: After years of development, teams from around the world had to get their bots to open doors, climb stairs and even drive a vehicle with limited human control.

[Graphic: Meet the future first responders]



But even with the advanced tech they carried, these bots took a tumble every now and then. Thank goodness that IEEE Spectrum compiled those falls, because they're delightful:

But for DRC robots, falling down is no big deal — as long as you can make it back up again, without human help, and still beat the time it took other competitors to complete the same task.

[The Pentagon’s fleet of robots may not be so menacing after all]

"These robots are big and made of lots of metal and you might assume people seeing them would be filled with fear and anxiety," DRC organizer Gill Pratt said in a statement. "But we heard groans of sympathy when those robots fell. And what did people do every time a robot scored a point? They cheered! It's an extraordinary thing, and I think this is one of the biggest lessons from DRC — the potential for robots not only to perform technical tasks for us, but to help connect people to one another."

The $2 million first prize went to Team Kaist of Daejeon, South Korea, and its robot, DRC-Hubo. A second prize of $1 million was awarded to Team IHMC Robotics of Pensacola, Fla., and its robot, Running Man. The $500,000 third prize went to Tartan Rescue of Pittsburgh and its robot, CHIMP.

(Darla Cameron/The Washington Post)
Here's DRC-Hubo accepting his big win:




To find out more about the winning bots — and the competitors they edged out — check out our recent graphic on the finalists.



Now watch breathtaking flyover of the dwarf planet Ceres

Topic edited 2 times, last edit by RouTe, 13 June 2015, 15:17  

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